Power and renewables

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Topics

Investing in CCUS - Commercial CCS capacity - Largest contributor to CCS - Highest capacity of CCS - Carbon-free gas - Cement production


In December 2022 and January 2023, over a third of 1,300 senior energy professionals surveyed across the energy industry expect their organization to increase investment in CCUS.

(Source: DNV, 2023, Trilemma and Transition: The momentum to break barriers) - All topics ↑


Total commercial CCS capacity in 2022 was 43 MtCO2 per year.

(Source: DNV, 2023, Energy Transition Outlook) - All topics ↑


By 2025, the largest contributor to CCS will be the natural gas processing industry with a share of about 40%. By the year 2050, the total energy-related captured CO2 is estimated to reach 1.25 GtCO2, with ammonia accounting for 46%, followed by e-fuel at 14%, and hydrogen at 8%.

(Source: DNV, 2023, Energy Transition Outlook) - All topics ↑


In 2050, North America will have the highest capacity of CCS (19%) followed by Europe and North East Eurasia, both around 17%. Globally, CCS in 2050.

(Source: DNV, 2023, Energy Transition Outlook) - All topics ↑


By mid-century, just 6% of gas will be carbon-free, of which hydrogen will supply roughly one quarter, with the balance made up through CCS in power and industry and by biomethane.

(Source: DNV, 2023, Energy Transition Outlook) - All topics ↑


Cement production is expected to grow less than 20% but its energy mix will remain highly carbon intensive, with electricity and hydrogen playing only marginal roles. Decarbonization goals will rely on CCS. Construction and mining will see the highest relative increase in energy demand (50%), but almost all of that growth will be met by an expansion of electrification.

(Source: DNV, 2023, Energy Transition Outlook) - All topics ↑

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